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WWL>Topics>>Scoot Show 2-13 10pm Ray Nagin Case

Scoot Show 2-13 10pm Ray Nagin Case

Feb 13, 2014|

was race a factor in the conviction of former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin? Will we ever get beyond race being an issue in anything we don’t agree with? Is race sometimes used as an excuse?

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Automatically Generated Transcript (may not be 100% accurate)

Once again we welcome everybody who is in town for the NBA all star weekend in this city really started to get crowded today it's going to be. Electric really just through the weekend it's a fun time to be in and around New Orleans. From the moment the pelicans. -- new -- when he became the -- from the moment. Here the pelicans mascot was was introduced. There was criticism of his looks. And I can relate to that because. I've been criticized because of my -- so it's understandable I'm sure he felt badly about it. Police had some major cosmetic surgery. -- he he looks in the beginning he look kind of scary. He seemed to have traits. That made him look like a very close relative to the clown penny wise in the Stephen King movie it -- kind of freaky. It really like a scary climb out. So -- is now return from major cosmetic surgery. And he looks more like got a cartoon character now. And maybe people will find it to be a little more friendly deal like the new. Pelicans mascot or did you like hear the way he he was before is plastic surgery. Yeah I'm sure you could find it on our website you can also find the picture of appear anywhere if you Google that. Now we're talking about it a jury deciding the fate of Michael -- the 47 year old man who shot into a -- teenagers following an argument about loud rap music. A seventy year old named Jordan Davis was killed -- it's white the teacher Jordan Davis. Which black in this argument erupted apparently over loud music. We've heard a lot about this case and from everything that I've heard I think the guy's guilty and there really needs to really needs to be punished severely you can't take a gun. And -- and seek revenge. Against somebody who was disrespectful to you. And -- and as we've said there's some parallels between this and the case of the year the seventy year old ex police officer who shot kill somebody in a movie theater over text. And apparently after the guys who popcorn -- face pulling a gun and shot. And maybe he was planning to shooting before that -- -- but you can't use a gun because you're upset. You can't use a gun to vent your anger or your frustration. -- -- for protection. And obviously some people don't understand now I have to admit I was in the courtroom with with Michael -- I haven't heard all the testimony. I'm not being instructed to make my decision based on the jury so I'm admitting that what I've heard from being in the court of public opinion. I think the guy's guilty. It seems like from the testimony that is even come from his fiancee. Who was with. It's it seems as if it wasn't self defense which is what he's claiming. Andy claims that this seventeen year old got out of the vehicle but then there's so much evidence indicates he never got the vehicle. And I believe there's even surveillance video from the convenience store where they work. Then it supports everything the prosecution saying in this guy Michael -- has been charged with first degree murder. Because getting into an argument might do him. Going to his glove compartment to get his weapon he has had a permit to carry concealed weapon ice like this give everybody who. Carries a concealed weapon a bad name. And I would think that big gun owners would want justice to be served in this case. Not to support somebody who's a fellow gonna -- But to. To want somebody who is giving -- our group. Abandoning. Based on -- life I've heard from this testimony this which reckless behavior. By an individual and an improper use of a guard. Which is not protected under the Second Amendment. So the jury has this case I'm sure there will be your verdict tomorrow. And if there is we'll talk about her on the show tomorrow night but if you're gonna join us for the comment about that or anything else were talking about. Our numbers 2601878. Toll free 8668890870. Our text or receive 7870 here's a Texas as before his surgery here at the master -- the pelicans. Looked like. The draw and from a clockwork orange. Now he just looks like. I'm garden variety goofy. Why couldn't we have felt like could we have just been called the brass. -- that was of a popular a name that came up when they were thinking about it changing the name from the corners to something else -- it was the delegates -- yeah I don't find appellate speaks and the guy. Relate to the mascot which really really creepy but now he's just kind of likened -- a cartoon character. I get to a -- -- just a moment for Marrero John -- WWL. Yeah I can make a point -- number -- alone this thing went on in the expand nuggets and they trial in the prominent trial of the preakness people who ran the lecture to Portland for years there is that with the go to India mayor on the north side. Beauty and that it takes so long line of people feel so comfortable lightning in. And meet them. All on the people that we don't know. And the -- Should be public you don't think yeah. If you took six things that at -- or sell equipment to the school. It should be unit televised on video or go to a public place. Where there is no way you can. You know -- -- You know the -- -- -- in its excellent. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- The public that believes that the crimes unit in the top of the quality in a certain comfort level out there now decided that that makes -- Why I agree and I also wanna point out again which I did yesterday and again earlier today when -- -- -- -- to mention it. That the the former corner of saint Tammany parish a -- Galvin. In the same building yesterday on the same day was sentenced to two years in prison. He didn't do exactly the same thing by. Essentially did the same thing that did -- negative which was take advantage of his position of power. And and rip off the taxpayers. And you know John they're just there's there seems to be something that happens to good people. When they take office when they're in that position and I'd like to think that there are people who can. Resist what even appears to be unbelievable temptation. -- -- -- -- who is under. -- John thanks solicit -- if you wanna join our show with figure coming tonight on numbers 2601870. Toll free 8668890. Point seven. And a tech's number state 77 -- -- tonight is titled Nagin and racism and it's about what we've been talking about tonight among other things. And that is the conviction of former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin and you all of this is happening when the national spotlight is on New Orleans with the NBA all star game in town this weekend. But the positive at that game is gonna totally overshadow. What has happened with this conviction and there are two ways to look at it. Is this a good thing or a bad thing for New Orleans. Some people would say that's a bad thing you know former mayor's convicted twentieth 21 counts. But others like myself which say this is a positive thing. Because it it it sends a message that. The the culture of of politics. Which is including corruption the culture is starting to change. Into soccer change overnight. But it is changing. And the more this happens the more we. Simply say. It's changing -- we're not gonna take it anymore and and I would hope that the country which are to have that same perception. I don't know why states do this. You know we we do this in Louisiana and every state does this. In my opinion it's a total waste of time. And now Hawaii has started. Hawaii has. Going to the trouble. Of declaring the ukulele. Well actually no this pillows under consideration. In Honolulu it hasn't happened yet but they're gonna debate. Whether the ukulele should become the official state musical instrument. I mean one. Tiny four string. Guitar like thing. Associated with Hawaii its the late eighteen hundreds. It was adopted by a -- royal family and became a symbol of patriotism. -- and as the island nation lost its its independence to the US. But I mean why -- states go to that you if I'm not mistaken and I'm sure you know about some of these things I don't have it in front of intricate signed. But if I'm not mistaken. We CNN has declared the mosquito. The official insect. A -- and I'm serious I'm serious. Widely. Mean I don't know maybe having an official bird may be that but to me that is just a total waste of time because nobody really goes around. And talks about how well this is the official list of Louisiana this is the official list of Mississippi. We don't go around and recognize these things. So why spend time in the legislature. Debating whether or not the ukulele should be the official. Musical instrument four YE. At wide debate things like that insect being the official insect of Louisiana. To me that is just a total waste of time. -- politicians but then again politicians know. How to waste our time. And our money don't they also tell -- we've talked about whether or not the word thug. Is a new nicer way to say. The inward. Because when I hear the word -- use quite often it's. Synonymous with the inward. If you and enjoy an issue with a -- tonight for our numbers 2601870. Toll free 8668890. Point 78. -- -- -- 77 years attacks I swear. I've got to be the only fourteen year old who listens to -- every night. They want me and I appreciate you listening thanks. Course is getting close to your bedtime president. We'll be right. Could -- -- DaVita Q well all right for real Williams will be among the celebrities in town performing as part of the NBA all star game weekend this weekend. I guess he's gonna where -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- But ridiculous. It's the NBA all star we get -- well as the city is getting crowded a lot of celebrities will be in town a lot of current and past -- NBA players will be in town will be out throughout the French Quarter. You know this is this is a time when some of the clubs in the quarter. Export girls from. Going to -- beef imports. Import girls in from from other clubs around the country it's so -- Some of the best dancers -- will be in town this weekend. Because this guys spend money. And also I'm thinking that if I take a walk through Harris this weekend I'm sure I'll see a lot of NBA players in NBA stars. Here's our -- to do a pretty general opinion poll do you think race was a factor in the conviction of Ray -- 91%. Say no. 9%. Say yes. Here's a text. I'm also fourteen and I listen every night that's from Robert. So we've got to tip to people who were fourteen listen to our show every -- -- -- guys -- -- or girls like I appreciate that -- Roberts a guy obviously in the -- didn't say so. Wanna welcome you or show. You know in a way you're not alone. Because if you listen to the show and listen to many of the callers you'll hear people who might not be fourteen but they act fourteen. -- immediate reaction to the guilty verdicts in the trial of former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin. Led to something that I really didn't expect and that was playing the race card. With the breaking news on the -- conviction yesterday I was asked to join Bobby guarantee -- -- -- sports talk to. Deal with some of the reaction from listeners about the guilty verdict because that was breaking news and it was breaking news we have. The saints and now although the big names that they had cut. The first caller we got yesterday it was from a woman who said that. She thought the former mayor. Did not get a fair trial because the jury was predominantly white. Nine jurors were white. Two -- nation. One was African American. Another caller mentioned that race was it was an issue and and commented on the conviction of what's a -- to bring up the trial of the white police officers accused of beating Rodney king and how they were found not guilty. In the a federal trial the first trial of of fraud became. In the middle of sports talk there was reaction to the conviction of the former black mayor. And how inspired the race card and and again I am really surprised when race comes up. As a reason or excuse for the result of the verdict or an unfortunate incident that somebody disagrees with. I really -- surprised because I didn't anticipate that race would be a reaction. And obviously most people don't think race is -- and regardless of color most people think race was a factor. But it just goes to it just goes to show you. How we still have a really big problem. It's a problem of racism. You know even before the reaction that I her while I was on WW well I was not expecting their verbal ranting. In the presence of the life TV cameras outside the courtroom when the news was breaking I was in my apartment watching. Ando a woman who is known as a local activist -- trying to shout out comments that. Would become part of the reporters live coverage. She was trying to interrupt their coverage with. Her perspective. Most of which he was shouting was inaudible. But I picked up a few things that it it's like I heard Ray Nagin was a scapegoat in numerous comments just general comments about the white system of justice. And the unfair treatment of blacks. This woman's rants. Also appeared to be laced with profanity eventually US Marshal stepped in. And diffuse the situation now everybody's entitled to freedom of speech. And another text. From another fourteen year old. A guy named Taylor says it's great we're really doing well with a fourteen -- was I really appreciate you you listen to our show and you're certainly welcome -- -- -- Or -- -- are showing you couldn't send me an email scoot it WWL dot com. Side I just glance over to our our -- tickets I think it's very encouraging. So this woman who was obviously venting frustration that a lot of people have -- that is a frustration with. The system of justice. You know Ray Nagin was supported by white and black voters he was elected and reelected with the hope of change. And race to seem to define ring make it. When did define him why it's an arrogance and his arrogant use of power in position for personal gain and that's something that transcends race. Our system of justice. Is not fair. Our system of justice is not -- In -- seemed to support conventional wisdom that blacks especially young black males and minorities. Are disproportionately convicted and sent to prison. Even if those groups are committing a disproportionate number of crimes the conviction rate of poor minorities in America. Seems to prove that justice is not fair. Justice seems to discriminate. More I think against economic status then race. But blacks and other minorities without means to pay for the best defense. May be disproportionately. -- affected by a system that really does pay a lot of attention to it to money. Consider the recent case of the white male teenager outside of Fort Worth, Texas which we talked about an issue. -- teenager sixteen years old from a very wealthy family. He was sentenced to probation. And time at a posh rehab the -- facility California. As a consequence for killing four people while drinking and driving. He apparently stole beer from Wal-Mart. Got in his vehicle drunk killed four people. Sentenced to probation and time in a very very posh. Slosh. Rehab facility California. Do you think of poor. Inner city black teenager would receive that same lenient sentence. I think is also fair to question if a less affluent white teenager would have escaped jail time. The defense argued that the teenager. Was suffering from athlete wins. A condition. Of being from a wealthy family that did not set proper limits for their son. Do you think everybody would have gotten that same treatment now. To the justice system. More favors money. And wealth that anything else. Racists also factored into the case we've been talking about the last couple of days tonight included. It's now in the hands of the jury Michael -- a white 47 year old man who's on trial in Jacksonville Florida for shooting and killing an unarmed seventeen year old black teenager. Following an argument over loud rap music he's claiming self defense. But in talking about this case here on the -- show I've received a few calls and -- from people who appear to excuse. The white man's frustration. Because he like many was just fed up with the thugs and their music. And I actually believe that plugs. Is being used as a word synonymous. With the inward. And to me this is really scary. But it's real it's a real attitude in America justifying violence because some people are just fed up with. And I I I read it and in in the text that I get from some people. The suggestion is that if you're fed up with the attitude of blacks or anyone you -- kill. It's understood because your standup. This week's Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas said in a speech before university. That quote we are probably today more race and difference conscious. Then I was in 1960s when I went to school. He continued. Now name a day that race doesn't come up differences in race differences in sex somebody says something. Everybody is sensitive. As a talk show host eyewitness how sensitive many Americans are about race and sexual orientation class at. Countless other factors that separate -- into different groups are never show that I do. And it's sad to me that my generation the baby boomer generation and anti establishment generation from the sixties. That helped spark the crusade for totally quality during the sixties and seventies is now. Actively keeping judgment based on race and sexual orientation and integral part of so many of today's debates. Which again is why I describe myself as a hostile witness to the baby boomer generation. The media. And both political parties benefit from racism. The media. Attracts attention from the heated battles that are -- Dover race. And as a result they're always gonna accentuate race whenever they -- as a factor in debates. Whenever they can. In 1960s Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. The staunch conservative. Used integration. To instill fear. In white America particularly in the south. He instilled fear that if integration. Moved forward. Whites would lose their status in society. And would no longer be able to associate with each other. Governor George Wallace was actually a moderate Republican. George Wallace. -- the ultimate segregationist. George Wallace lost his first campaign for governor of Alabama. Any change to reflect the -- fear of integration by becoming a staunch segregationist. And that's what got him not only elected governor but also led to his presidential campaign. And he was running. I guess who is in 1964. As an independent. The strategy of attracting votes based on the loss of of of whites. That would whites would suffer. For equality and integration was known as southern strategy. And parts of that remain as a strategy that many candidates still have it's us against them mentality. And it rallies many voters around certain candidates to speak in code rather than in -- language about preferential treatment of blacks. Racism is not as physically present as it once Wallace. But there's a strong undercurrent of racism on both sides. That is become so instinct. And it doesn't matter if there are more white racist or more black racist keeping score doesn't matter the point is racism is prevalent. That is wrong and it's embarrassing that it's still a factor today. What is your gonna take to get over this tendency to play the race card. When race really isn't even a factor. You know there's this theory dead. People gain power. Through being victims. It's. It's the power of victimization. If I'm a victimized somehow get attention I somehow I somehow have power. And so maybe sometimes without even realizing it people. People try to become victims. Because it gets them attention. I don't think America is yet ready to have an honest conversation about race relations. Because people are more interested in finding things that support their preconceived notions. Rather than. Try to find out a true understanding of somebody's position. You know we're all entitled to our perception of life. Because perception of life is is is how we see it but it's not always reality. Often it's just perception and should be recognized -- that. I speak. And observed from my point of view from what I've been through in my life. How I grew up and what I see. What was stair -- was unfair. But it's important for me to try to understand another person's point of view. And that point of view from another person has been formed by their experiences in life. And so off and I think we make a mistake by thinking that everybody else sees the world the way we do. And that's unrealistic. Somebody else just to see the world like Q. If you're white you can't pretend to know exactly how blacks see the world. And if you're black you shouldn't assume that because I'm white that it's always been easy for me. I just don't I don't think we're ready to have that that honest conversation about about race relations. Intolerance. Is less demanding intolerance. Intolerance requires no effort. But tolerance. Requires an effort to listen. And try to understand those who have a different perspective on life that takes effort. And understanding. That our perspective is not the only perspective may be the first step toward having that honest conversation about race in America. The automatic assumption that former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin. Did not get a fair trial because only one sure which black suggest that all whites are racist. And incapable. Of fairly judging a person of color. We can recognize. The present. And the past injustices. But it's wrong to imply that a white jury cannot fairly judge a black defendant. And this was a man Ray Nagin who was supported by many whites which is why he became mayor of New Orleans. And and seen by many as a as a hero and demanding that the federal government come down here and do something after Katrina federal -- was dragging its feet and Ray Nagin was that ultimate cheerleader. For New Orleans. So that's why his conviction is -- is it ambivalent moment for so many people it's a happy it's the same as it's it's happy to OK well he got caught he's gonna be convicted this is cleaning things up he's getting punished. But it's a sad thing because of the fall from grace. I think it's also fair to suggest that. A black jury. Could fairly judge a white defendant. Until our instinctive reaction. That race is a mitigating factor to everything. We continue to support racism in America. If you are join -- with a comic tonight our number is 260187. -- toll free 866. 89 is nearly seventy. In a text -- -- 77. -- blog tonight is titled Reagan and bassist -- Nagin and racism it's a turning on our website and our opinions front page WWL dot com it's also our FaceBook page -- and join that conversation and our FaceBook pages. -- -- -- -- If you're -- stay -- it's more of your calls. And text are next. On the Scotia. Under the WL do you think race was a factor in the conviction of Ray Nagin as a WW a pretty general opinion poll tonight 91%. Say no and 9% say yes. Give us your opinion by going to our web site WWO dot com giving an -- that it just -- It's your calls but here's a really interesting text. Cisco if -- -- forty -- stand and you who dat -- Then I became who -- after years of supporting the 49ers. Would you trust me to be true saints fan. If you look at it this way blacks are racist. They just don't trust their white counterparts. Well here's what's unfair and racist about that. There are some whites like me. There were never racists. So you can't compare that to. Needing a forty niners fan -- at fan and and converting and in becoming another I I didn't convert. We see so many movies that accurately. -- show. The plight of blacks. Not too long ago in this country. The movie Lincoln. The movie the Butler -- here's a slate. Accurate depictions. Of what it was like. It wasn't that long ago. And there are people today who work directly affected but indirectly they still heard the stories from their fathers and grandfathers. Who did experience. Those starts. And I'd like to see. I'd like to see movies about it. About how whites. Actually helped. I'd like to see movies that also show. The other side of this debate about race. Did the the white states thought there were injustices. The whites that that helped to make. Change happened. And it wasn't just the blacks that manifested change. It was white Americans well. I'd like to see movies that we showed that side of of this debate as well. -- majority texture just a moment -- Roger you're -- show good evening. Say it yes. Folks who. Day. In the war. And I think the two reasons. On monologue. Were in oh and there's some of those who option. -- politicians. Court politicians all in the view all of them not you are on the and -- you. He's been in the in the as. It. Would be about. We don't put that effort in to. -- people. People like the and it buried crew. You know what acquired that they'd be and so. -- you know on the opening up and it. I'm Roger and I'm glad you called. There are you know we've we've so often learn -- When we view cases from the outside we -- impressions on on innocence and guilt. But when it comes to applying the law. Sometimes it doesn't seem -- -- was we can only hope and pray that even if we disagree with it we can only hope and pray that. The justice is actually served. And in the case of the of the tragedy. And our surrounding Henry Glover all that went along with that with the Danziger case. It's a complicated case to say the least and I wasn't clear I certainly have my impression of of what happened. And it seemed like it was a terrible injustice. But in terms of the way the laws applied. Again I -- I can't I can't speak to that. In the case of -- Ray Nagin again and it just seems like the evidence was who was overwhelming but again I'm just I'm I'm. I have a difficult time. -- team. Everything about the Danziger bridge case because I certainly have my impression and it seems like just one of those horrific situations. But I'd like to think that nobody gets away with that or nobody gets away with anything. And that law enforcement. Is held accountable. For their behavior. Even if it's an emotional state pitcher yet. And and everybody would agree that. That would happen after Katrina. That would went on in this city. Once it was difficult. To say the least. An end in and people were dealing with things that they'd never thought they would have to have to deal with. But if -- police officer. You have to deal with that an emotion can't take over. You've got to react in the right way again I wasn't they are on the Danziger bridge. Told you what I think. And I hope justice is served. If you wanna join -- show with your comment tonight -- numbers 2601870. Toll free 866889. Certainly seventy a text number 677. Remember intolerance. Is easy and convenient. Tolerance. Takes effort. This is -- -- shell. And we'll be right back on giving him you know this is a relatively new group band is called. The 1975. Songs on -- Like -- -- -- -- facility in Tennessee says there's a breaking story about a couple in Tennessee. A package blew up killing the couple. And the son in law and the daughter of the dead couple has been charged out of Georgia BA here under the WL. We're gonna go yeah yes McCain is it cold there are you staying off the street. Street. Who. Industry group. Be carefully -- -- -- Quit you -- The end you gonna be pretty panicky. And now. I'm now albeit picket. Them are -- great. Great okay. -- court. All right Stevie Wonder could beat. Pretty. The Bear Bryant. Well not a tragedy. Are what -- -- -- that would be one thing it would have ended the strike disregard. Well in all come out without power there all around -- well. Talk about what people don't want because the truth is they are very. Marriage BA I'm really glad you called but it's going to be hard to have an honest conversation about race if you gonna just get into semantics like that. I've got a public text about the about the movie 42 about Jackie Robinson. And about how. Whites contributed to -- changing baseball. -- and I haven't seen the movie that I've I've wanted to see is maybe I'll I'll I'll try and rented this weekend but that's a movie apparently that shows. Another side I just think there should be. There should be an audience for movies that that also show the other side of racism and that is the number of whites that helped change America. I'm -- and will be back after the news.

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